American Art of the Week

American Art of the Week: Sunlight on the Coast by Winslow Homer

Winslow Homer, Sunlight on the Coast, 1890. Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio. Photo via the-athenaeum.org. I featured another painting by Winslow Homer a few weeks ago, but today is his birthday, so it would be just wrong to not acknowledge it. This work is very different in tone from "The Milkmaid", although the actual… Continue reading American Art of the Week: Sunlight on the Coast by Winslow Homer

American Art of the Week

American Art of the Week: The Gross Clinic by Thomas Eakins

The controversy surrounding the career of American realist painter Thomas Eakins (1844-1916) is perfectly encapsulated by his great painting The Gross Clinic. The Philadelphia-born Eakins loved naturalistic detail and was a strong advocate for the use of nude models in artists' education

American Art of the Week

American Art of the Week: Wonderland Circus, Sideshow Coney Island by Reginald Marsh

Reginald Marsh, Wonderland Circus, Sideshow Coney Island, 1930.Tempera on canvas stretched on Masonite.  Today's painting is not yet in the public domain, so click here to view it. I try so hard never to do post about works I can't actually show you, but this artist is too wonderful to overlook simply because he died… Continue reading American Art of the Week: Wonderland Circus, Sideshow Coney Island by Reginald Marsh

American Art of the Week

American Art of the Week: The Milkmaid by Winslow Homer

I think we've established my great love of the American Impressionists in recent weeks, so it's time for something different. Winslow Homer (1836-1910) was a nineteenth-century American painter who worked in a more naturalistic style. He painted many New England landscapes, seascapes, and scenes of rural life.

American Art of the Week

American Art of the Week: Edwin Booth by John Singer Sargent

This week's artist, like last week's, is among the most famous artists in American history. John Singer Sargent (1856-1925) made many of his best-known works, including the scandalous Portrait of Madame X, during the many years in which he lived in Europe, but he was an American-born artist who painted many American subjects throughout his career. Today's featured work depicts Edwin Booth (1833-1893) - actor, theatre owner, and older brother of Lincoln's assassin.

American Art of the Week

American Art of the Week: View from Mount Holyoke (The Oxbow) by Thomas Cole

Romanticist and landscape painter Thomas Cole was born in England but came to success in New York in the 1820s. He was a founder of the so-called Hudson River School. View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, after a Thunderstorm—The Oxbow, is among Cole's best-known works.