Art History

Failure… or Not (WordPress Writing 101 Prompt #14)

Today’s assignment was to pick up the nearest book, turn to page twenty-nine, and write a post based on the first word that you notice on that page. In a fashion that should not surprise anyone who knows anything about me, my nearest book was Robert Edsel’s The Monuments Men. I’m nothing if not predictable.… Continue reading Failure… or Not (WordPress Writing 101 Prompt #14)

Art History

WordPress Writing 101 Prompt #9: What Manet’s Girls Saw

For today's prompt about writing from a different point of view, I decided to describe a work of art from the perspective of a figure depicted in the work. I have chosen Edouard Manet's Railroad (Gare St-Lazare) at the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., a painting noted for its opaque psychology, unclear narrative, and… Continue reading WordPress Writing 101 Prompt #9: What Manet’s Girls Saw

Architecture · Art History

WordPress Writing 101 Prompt #8: Evocative Worlds in the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Today’s prompt involves describing a place with the added challenge of doing so without using adverbs. The prompt specifies that I go to a place and describe it while I’m there, but I will describe someplace from memory because the weather is crummy, I competed this morning, and I have no desire to go back… Continue reading WordPress Writing 101 Prompt #8: Evocative Worlds in the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Art History

Isabella Stewart Gardner: the Lady, the Legend, the Legacy ~ a guest post by Alexandra G. Kiely

Susan Abernethy (The Freelance History Writer) was kind enough to invite me to write this guest post for her. I chose to write about American art collector Isabella Stewart Gardner, founder of the museum of the same name in Boston, Massachusetts. Check out my article and the rest of Susan’s wonderful blog!

The Freelance History Writer

Alexandra is a twenty-something art historian and researcher with omnivorous interests in arts, culture, and history. She is also a figure skater and a dancer. Read more about her various intellectual pursuits at ascholarlyskater.wordpress.com.

Isabella Stewart Gardner in Venice, 1894 as painted by Anders Zorn Isabella Stewart Gardner in Venice, 1894 as painted by Anders Zorn

Isabella Stewart Gardner. Even among the ranks of art collectors – glamorous and fascinating characters all – that name looms large. A rare, early female art collector, and more importantly a female who founded her own museum, she was a powerful member of late nineteenth-century Boston’s influential upper crust. She was a woman of great curiosity and fierce intellect who travelled the world and made friends with the likes of Henry James, but she was also the subject of sensational news stories in her day and extravagant legends in ours. Her name will forever be associated with the mysterious and still-unsolved 1990 robbery that…

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Art History

Book Review: Figure Skating and the Arts, Eight Centuries of Sport and Inspiration

When my new boss found out that I'm a figure skater, the first thing he said was "I have a book you really need to see." That book is Figure Skating and the Arts, Eight Centuries of Sport and Inspiration. After locating it amidst the vast inventory of books we work with, he gave it to… Continue reading Book Review: Figure Skating and the Arts, Eight Centuries of Sport and Inspiration

Art History · Contemporary Art

Portrait of the Artist’s Daughter

Australian photographer Bill Gekas has been getting a lot of attention recently. His work has been featured everywhere from Buzzfeed to The Magazine Antiques, and I think I'll give him some press here as well. Gekas's work consists of portraits of his young daughter dressed up and posed in the style of Old Master paintings. I… Continue reading Portrait of the Artist’s Daughter