Gargoyle of the Day

Gargoyle of the Day: St. Giles, High Kirk of Edinburgh

My Facebook friend Sara requested gargoyles of the Scottish Highlands for my next gargoyle of the day. Unfortunately, I haven't had any luck tracking down photos of specifically Highland gargoyles. So many of the gorgeous churches out there are in such a state of ruin that in most cases, whatever gargoyles they may have once had… Continue reading Gargoyle of the Day: St. Giles, High Kirk of Edinburgh

Gargoyle of the Day

Gargoyle of the Day: Westminster Abbey, London

I'm quickly becoming obsessed with the gargoyles of Westminster in London. I think they just have such a unique character that sets them apart from the rest. This little guy is more of a grotesque than a true gargoyle, but his charm is exactly the variety that I'm talking about. You can see more of the Westminster gargoyles in this… Continue reading Gargoyle of the Day: Westminster Abbey, London

Gargoyles

Fantastic Beasts (Oh Look, I Found One)

  Harry Potter fans (such as myself) will certainly enjoy this basilisk grotesque carved into the façade of Amiens Cathedral in France. It is interesting that the basilisk (or cockatrice) of medieval legend looks almost nothing like the one described in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, but its other characteristics and the deadly effects… Continue reading Fantastic Beasts (Oh Look, I Found One)

Celtic and Irish Art · Gargoyles

An Unusual Take on Gargoyles

I recently finished reading Thomas Cahill's How the Irish Saved Civilization, The Untold Story of Ireland's Heroic Role from the Fall of Rome to the Rise of Medieval Europe. My prior training in medieval art history had addressed the importance of the medieval Irish and Scottish monastic establishment on Western European cultural history, so the… Continue reading An Unusual Take on Gargoyles

Gargoyles · Manuscripts · Medieval Art and Architecture

Demons in Pen and Ink

In one of my last posts, I promised that I would talk about non-architectural grotesques. So meet the Hours of Jeanne d'Evreux, a fourteenth-century illustrated French prayer book by Jean Pucelle. It now resides at the Cloisters in New York, and I highly recommend going to see it. It is certainly not the only medieval… Continue reading Demons in Pen and Ink