31 Days of Medieval Manuscripts

The Hours of Jeanne d’Evreux – Day Two of Medieval Manuscripts

Today's manuscript is the Hours of Jeanne d'Evreux, a selection that isn't nearly as famous as yesterday's Book of Kells but is widely known in art history. The Hours of Jeanne d'Evreux is an example of a book of hours, a calendar of prayers for the hours of the day and the main religious events of the year.… Continue reading The Hours of Jeanne d’Evreux – Day Two of Medieval Manuscripts

Medieval Art and Architecture

Basilique Royale de Saint-Denis (WordPress Writing 101 Prompt #17)

 Today’s prompt didn’t particularly interest me or feel like a good fit for this blog, but the additional challenge was to write in a style different from my usual one, which I liked a lot. I like my writing to flow and include lots of description; I never skimp on the words. Therefore, I decided… Continue reading Basilique Royale de Saint-Denis (WordPress Writing 101 Prompt #17)

Art History

WordPress Writing 101 Prompt #9: What Manet’s Girls Saw

For today's prompt about writing from a different point of view, I decided to describe a work of art from the perspective of a figure depicted in the work. I have chosen Edouard Manet's Railroad (Gare St-Lazare) at the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., a painting noted for its opaque psychology, unclear narrative, and… Continue reading WordPress Writing 101 Prompt #9: What Manet’s Girls Saw

Gargoyles

Fantastic Beasts (Oh Look, I Found One)

  Harry Potter fans (such as myself) will certainly enjoy this basilisk grotesque carved into the façade of Amiens Cathedral in France. It is interesting that the basilisk (or cockatrice) of medieval legend looks almost nothing like the one described in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, but its other characteristics and the deadly effects… Continue reading Fantastic Beasts (Oh Look, I Found One)

Ancient & Classical Art

The Origin of the World’s Art: Prehistoric Cave Painting (HeadStuff)

Link to an article I wrote for HeadStuff.org about prehistoric European cave paintings. These paintings, which date back millennia, are the oldest known paintings in world history. They give us our best clues about the origins and art and why humans first felt compelled to create it.