Gargoyle of the Day

Gargoyle of the Day: Notre Dame de Paris

Today's grotesque is a true classic. The gargoyles of Notre Dame cathedral in Paris are neither the oldest nor the most interesting of their kind, but they have certainly become the most famous. The interior and exterior of this church, which was a major milestone in the history of Gothic architecture, were both rather creatively restored by Gothic Revival proponent… Continue reading Gargoyle of the Day: Notre Dame de Paris

Gargoyle of the Day

Gargoyle of the Day: Chateau de Pierrefonds, Oise, France

Most of the time, gargoyles perform their function as gutters by sticking out from the side of a building and diverting water horizontally. This gargoyle on the 12th-century Chateau de Pierrefonds in France has a different approach. He sends water downward as his long body slithers down the castle wall. I'm not sure if he is an alligator, crocodile, enormous… Continue reading Gargoyle of the Day: Chateau de Pierrefonds, Oise, France

31 Days of Medieval Manuscripts

Vernacular Literature – Day Sixteen of Medieval Manuscripts

Today's post builds off my of most recent one. I want to talk about manuscripts containing vernacular literature, or popular stories written in the commonly-spoken language of a country (perhaps French or German), rather than in scholarly or sacred languages such as Latin. In this category were romances, epics, poems, adventure stories, legends, and other works of literature read for pleasure… Continue reading Vernacular Literature – Day Sixteen of Medieval Manuscripts

31 Days of Medieval Manuscripts

The Roman de the Rose – Day Fifteen of Medieval Manuscripts

The Roman de la Rose is a thirteenth-century French poem concerning an allegorical love story between a young man and a rose. Began by French writer Guillaume de Lorris and finished after his death by Jean de Meun, the poem was very popular in medieval France and was the subject of many richly-illustrated manuscripts. The story and its rich symbolism… Continue reading The Roman de the Rose – Day Fifteen of Medieval Manuscripts

31 Days of Medieval Manuscripts

The Manuscript Collection of Jean de Berry – Day Seven of Medieval Manuscripts

Instead of focusing on a manuscript or a component of one, I've chosen to write today about one of history's most famous and prolific medieval collectors of manuscripts. Jean de Berry (1340-1416) was a French duke and the brother of King Charles V of France. An extremely wealthy and well-connected nobleman, Jean de Berry collected all sorts of… Continue reading The Manuscript Collection of Jean de Berry – Day Seven of Medieval Manuscripts

31 Days of Medieval Manuscripts

The Hours of Jeanne d’Evreux – Day Two of Medieval Manuscripts

Today's manuscript is the Hours of Jeanne d'Evreux, a selection that isn't nearly as famous as yesterday's Book of Kells but is widely known in art history. The Hours of Jeanne d'Evreux is an example of a book of hours, a calendar of prayers for the hours of the day and the main religious events of the year.… Continue reading The Hours of Jeanne d’Evreux – Day Two of Medieval Manuscripts

Medieval Art and Architecture

Basilique Royale de Saint-Denis (WordPress Writing 101 Prompt #17)

 Today’s prompt didn’t particularly interest me or feel like a good fit for this blog, but the additional challenge was to write in a style different from my usual one, which I liked a lot. I like my writing to flow and include lots of description; I never skimp on the words. Therefore, I decided… Continue reading Basilique Royale de Saint-Denis (WordPress Writing 101 Prompt #17)